Posts Tagged ‘true justice’

Calling Good Evil and Evil Good

Sunday, June 18th, 2017

Dear Friends,

It seems to me, Glaucon’s question is pertinent today and is in many ways, the source of the societal convulsions we are presently experiencing. To those unfamiliar with The Republic, Glaucon’s question to Socrates was, “Is it better to be just and thought unjust, or better to be unjust and considered just?” The question went to the heart of the matter they were discussion, is justice really a good or only something we use to trick fools into following the “great men?” He went on to explain that someone who is just, but considered unjust, will be spat upon, ridiculed, attacked and his or her interests destroyed, while he who is unjust but considered just, will be lauded, protected and the road paved before him. Today our media tells us that people who clearly are unjust (evil), are just(good), and those who are just, as unjust. Seemingly to forward injustice as justice, which goes to the heart of The Republic’s premise, what is the nature of justice?

Machiavelli touched on the same question in The Prince. In that book, Machiavelli said that a wise prince must be dishonest (unjust) while appearing at all times to be honest (just). He went on that the way to appear just while being unjust is by several means. One must constantly claim to be honest, even when one is a consummate liar, because people will hear the words and forget the actions. We have the example today of Clinton and Obama, who lied constantly, about significant things, but are still considered by many as honest. Obama’s “you can keep your doctor,” and “Benghazi was due to an internet video,” are two glaring examples of our leaders following Machiavelli’s advice, be dishonest while claiming to be honest. The media backed those two liars, so they would appear to be honest, the media in other words, went to great lengths to make the unjust appear just.

Meanwhile, the media has bent over backwards to claim Trump, and Reagan before him, are/were bad people. The legacy media that calls itself unbiased threw mud at Reagan incessantly. They re branded Reagan’s every initiative, The strategic defense initiative was re branded as Star wars, Reagan’s supply side economics was called trickle down, are but two examples of many. Trump has faced the vitriol of the media since he became a viable candidate. Before that he was used as a tool to discredit republicans. That shenanigan backfired in the faces of the media that calls itself unbiased and helped get Trump in office. Clearly, judging by their actions the media is seeking to paint Trump, who may very well be just, as unjust.

Today, the media dutifully pretend that open calls for violence against republicans, is mere rhetoric. Claiming evil is actually good and thereby making the unjust appear just, while they make the just appear unjust. Knowing the way people treat those they consider evil, the media is complicit in creating “Great Men,” cut from the same cloth as other “great men,” Alexander, Caesar, Napoleon, Tamerlane, Hitler and Lenin… mass murderers every one. One thing they all had in common was that they were considered, at the time and some even today, as just, when they were anything but. The result of the media’s calling injustice, justice, evil good and good evil, is the political violence we are seeing today.

Take a look at what the media calls just, stealing from producers, and redistributing that ill gotten gain to politically favored groups. If an action is wrong (unjust) for me to do, then it is equally wrong for you, and even a group of people, no matter the size of that group. If a mob smashes a store window and steals the merchandise, it is as wrong as if you or I did it, and even if that mob consists of three hundred million rioters, it is still unjust. To claim it is, warps not only logic, but morality as well. The “great men” as Thrasymachus called them, seek to appear just, while they are unjust, as a means to trick the rest of us into believing in justice, so they can engage in injustice without oversight.

The ancient Greeks understood the nature on Man better than we do today. Today we are dazzled by technology and science, blinding us to fundamental truths of humanity. In our hubris at what our fathers have created, we forget the reality of human nature, and imagine we are gods. Yet we are reaping what we have sown, treating injustice as justice, is a sure path to economic collapse, crime, violence and human suffering. No less today that two thousand five hundred years ago. The heft of human history shows the absurdity of allowing the evil to masquerade as good while destroying the good out of ignorance of their goodness. Moreover, today the media calls those who are good, evil, because they are good!

So, we have a situation where the just are attacked, ridiculed and destroyed, for an unjust political end that is portrayed as just, while those who are unjust are lauded, protected and aided in ad for their injustice. Worse, the good today are attacked, for their goodness! To change this paradigm, stop the political violence, economic degradation, rising rates of crime and drug use, economic inequality, as well as the overt corruption in our governments… we must think for ourselves, see with our minds as well as our ears and our hearts, separate the just from the unjust… and refuse to be fooled again. Only then will Glaucon’s question be answered in the affirmative, yes, it is better to be just and considered unjust, than to be unjust and considered just, because humanity’s future depends on it.

Sincerely,

John Pepin

Our Unjust World

Monday, September 26th, 2016

 

Dear Friends,

It seems to me, a simple working definition of justice, is to treat everyone equally, but a more nuanced definition is, to equally treat people as they deserve to be treated. Just as you would not trust a thief to watch your home, or a child molester to watch your child, most anyone would trust a saint to watch either. It is not that they are treated differently, but they are treated as they deserve, should the saint become a thief or a child molester, our treatment of them would change to reflect what they deserve. Justice demands all people be treated as they merit, equally and without discrimination. In the end, the person who is a villain should be treated as a villain, and the saint should be treated as a saint. Sadly, in this world those who are powerful are always held to the lowest standard of conduct, no matter what their actions merit, while those of low station are always held to the highest standard of conduct, regardless of their virtuous actions, due to their ability to damage or help us. This is a violation of justice. The way justice determines merit, is by our actions, not our station, race or religion.

We live in a time where justice is unknown. The news is full of examples where villains are praised and heroes are attacked… injustice is called justice. When a thug with a long history of violence threatens a police officer with a gun, and is shot by that police officer, popular culture credits the thug with every virtue known to man, while the police officer is vilified, leading to other thugs rioting, destroying property, stealing and worst of all, attacking innocent people simply because of their race. Instead of justice, where those thugs would be rounded up, tried and if found guilty, serve long jail sentences, they are given a pass, ostensibly because of their race, but in reality because the violence forwards the agenda of the political faction in power.

Who can claim it just, that a politician is caught red handed destroying evidence that implicates her in allowing top secret material to fall into the hands of our enemies, walks free, even as lowly navy personnel are charged and jailed for far far less? Moreover, it would appear that US secrets are known by everyone, including our mortal enemies… but not the people. If people are treated as they merit, by their actions, not by their political affiliation or power, we would see many politicians going to jail and few junior officers languishing in Leavenworth. Justice does not brooch unequal treatment and is not based on political standing, it is based on merit, for good or bad.

How can anyone look at you with a straight face and say the non punishment meted out to the CEO of Wells Fargo is just? We all know that the culture of any group, organization or company comes from the top. People go where leaders lead. If the culture of Wells Fargo was such that lowly employees were opening millions of fraudulent accounts, to pad the profits of the company, that culture came from the top. Add to that, over five thousand employees were fired for it, yet not one has been prosecuted despite the serious nature of the crime, and a blind man can see the injustice. Those who are punished are the shareholders of Wells Fargo, who had no hand in the crime but are paying the price, in a diminishment of their stock values, stocks they paid for with hard earned money and rely on for their retirement. The other people punished are the customers who were harmed, while the government gets a windfall, and the employees who have done no wrong but who’s careers are jeopardized by the culture of Wells Fargo.

People have an innate justice meter, we know when an injustice is done, and we react accordingly. If our ability to act is hemmed in by government power, if in fact, that injustice is promoted by government…then we loose faith in the system, our stake in society is eroded and we will act unjustly ourselves, anytime we believe we can get away with it. Naked injustice then is the means for a society to fall into chaos, violence and poverty. The facts are clear and they stare us in the face. Everywhere we look there is violence, on our streets, in our schools and at our places of business. Poverty is on the rise like never before since the industrial revolution, while the elite profit from their crimes. The world our forefathers have built and we have been blessed with, is crumbling around our heads and ears, all because, as we know in our hearts… people are not treated as they deserve.

Sincerely,

John Pepin